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ARS 13-3407

Charged with Possession of Another Person’s Prescription Drug

Charged with Possession of Another Person’s Prescription Drug

Drug possession charges often carry stiff penalties. Even being in possession of another person’s prescription drugs can result in felony charges. In Arizona, the penalty for drug possession depends on the type and amount of the drug found on a person as well as the individuals past criminal history. An experienced criminal defense attorney can mount several defenses to Below are some common charges that can result from being in possession of prescription drugs:

Potential charges relating to possession of a prescription-only drug in Arizona

Unlawful possession of a prescription-only drug

Individuals may be convicted of unlawful possession of a prescription-only drug when they knowingly possess prescription-only drugs belonging to another person, including friends and family members. In order to be convicted of unlawful drug possession, the state must prove both that the accused knowingly possessed the drug and that the accused knew that the drug was a prescription-only drug.

The penalties for possessing a prescription-only drug are relatively mild compared to other drug charges. Unlawfully possessing a prescription-only drug is a misdemeanor and carries with it a sentence up to six months in jail, potentially up to $4,575 in fines and penalties, and three years on probation.

Possession or use of a dangerous drug

Dangerous drugs” are defined as any narcotic other than marijuana and include certain prescription drugs, such as Oxycontin, Percocet, Vicodin and benzodiazapines. Although the elements of the crime are similar to the unlawful prescription-only drugs, possession or use of a dangerous drug carries with it a much more stringent penalty. The crime is a class 4 felony and is punishable by up to fifteen years in prison, depending on the defendant’s prior criminal history.

Judges have the authority to sentence defendants convicted of dangerous drug possession as a class 1 misdemeanor. Further, pursuant to Proposition 200, defendants who are first or second-time drug offenders can only be sentenced to probation, in a addition to drug treatment, community service and fines. Although defendants may be sentenced for short jail stays for up to 2 weeks for probation violations, the judge must reinstate probation upon completion of jail time.
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Penalties for Possession of Drugs for Sale in Arizona

Penalties for Possession of Drugs for Sale in Arizona

In the state of Arizona, if you are caught using or in possession of a drug such as meth (methamphetamines) or other narcotics, you can be charged with a class 4 felony. This includes drugs like hallucinogenic drugs, prescription medications, and amphetamines.

What is Dangerous Drug Possession in Arizona?

According to Arizona Revised Statute, ARS 13-3407 prohibits the use and possession of dangerous drugs. It also prohibits:

  • The sale of dangerous drugs.
  • The possession of any chemical and supplies that are used in the production of making drugs.
  • The manufacturing of dangerous drugs.
  • Giving the drugs to someone else, regardless of whether or not you made a profit off of it.
  • Getting dangerous drugs by misrepresentation, deceit, and fraud.
  • Transporting the drugs into Arizona or within the state.

What are the dangerous drugs outlined in this law? Well, they are broken down into several categories, and they are:

  • Any type of amphetamines, this includes meth.
  • Any type of hallucinogenic substance. For example, acid and mescaline.
  • Any type of drug that gives off a depressant effect on the central nervous system.
  • Any anabolic steroids. This includes the use of testosterone.

One important thing to remember in the state of Arizona is that if you have any drug, no matter what form it is in, it is illegal to possess unless you have a doctor’s written prescription. In certain ways the laws are worded, you could have a small ingredient of a particular drug that could make you responsible for having the drug in your possession. You could face punishment for it just like you would if you had the entire drug in front of you.

Here at DM Cantor, we see these types of felony drug charges frequently and can help you to get your drug charge dismissed, reduced, or another positive outcome. We have many years of experience in drug cases and can help you to beat your charges. If you have been charged with possession of drugs for sale or transporting drugs in Arizona, contact our office today so that we can help you.

 

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Arizona Laws for Legally Cultivating Marijuana

Arizona Laws for Legally Cultivating Marijuana

You might think that because Arizona and Colorado are neighbors, that Arizona might adopt the same laws as Colorado when it comes to marijuana. However, this is not the case. Arizona has some of the strictest laws in the country. In November of 2016, there was a measure that would have legalized marijuana. It was called Proposition 205. It failed by a narrow margin, and Arizona still has some of the strongest laws known in the United States.

Rules for Possession of Marijuana

The only way that you can legally grow marijuana in the State of Arizona is if you have a medical marijuana ID card. This must be given only by a licensed MD., DO, or N.D. in Arizona. When you have a medical card, this will allow you to possess 2.5 ounces every 2 weeks, and you will be allowed to grow up to 12 plants as long as you do not live within 25 miles of a dispensary.

Arizona marijuana is also known as cannabis. It is labeled as a Schedule 1 controlled substance. This law also includes all the different forms of marijuana, including concentrates and edibles. If you are caught with any form of cannabis, you will face a felony charge under the ARS 13-3405. The charges for possession of marijuana will depend on how much you have, and what the specific charge is.

Medical Marijuana in Arizona

Proposition 203 was first defeated in 2002 but the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act eventually passed in 2010 by the voters in Arizona. If you want to use medical marijuana in Arizona, you will have to be registered with the Arizona Department of Health Services, and have a registry identification card. To qualify you must:

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Overview of Possession of a Dangerous Drug Laws in Arizona

A question we get from clients quite often is What is Possession of a Dangerous Drug in Arizona?

In this short video, David Cantor explains Dangerous Drug charges in Arizona:

Arizona law defines a dangerous drug as a prescription narcotic that is not marijuana. Usually, dangerous drugs include cocaine, methamphetamine or prescription drugs used as antidepressants or pain medication.

A.R.S. §13-3407, the statute that addresses the possession or use of a dangerous drug in Arizona, establishes a variety of parameters regarding dangerous drugs. In addition to defining dangerous drugs, the statute categorizes the offense as a class 4 felony. However, if the offender has no prior felony convictions and if the drug is not an amphetamine or a methamphetamine, the judge could reduce the offense to a class 1 misdemeanor.

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Proposition 200, enacted by Arizona voters in 1996, made many offenses for possession of drugs punishable by only probation, including first and second non-violent crimes. This means that offenders will receive no time in custody unless they violate their probation terms and are arrested. In that event, the defendant could need to wait in jail until the courts reinstate probation, which could take up to a month. However, possession of methamphetamine does not qualify for Proposition 200 designation.

Drug offenders who are charged with a misdemeanor could receive up to six months in custody for probation violation. Sometimes, another option for first-time drug offenders is TASC, which defers prosecution for one to two years until the defendant fulfills all the requirements of the program. While the program is strict and well-structured, it enables defendants to qualify for a complete dismissal of the possession of dangerous drugs charge.

For six months, TASC candidates must attend a weekly group counseling session and attend two support group meetings a week, such as AA or NA. They must also complete a three-hour substance abuse education class and submit to drug and alcohol testing as scheduled. Finally, they must report for at least one office visit every month. Offenders are responsible for all program costs, which range from $2,000 to $2,500.

A class 4 felony that is determined ineligible for Proposition 200 can mean a sentence ranging from probation with no time in custody up to a prison sentence of between 12 months and 45 months. For an offender who has a prior felony record, the time in custody increases accordingly.

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