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Forfeiture

What Happens if I Violate my Bail Conditions?

What Happens if I Violate my Bail Conditions?

If you’re arrested for a crime in Arizona, you will likely be given a bond by the judge in your case. When you receive this bond, you’ll have to abide by several “bail conditions.” What are these bond conditions? They’re particular to every case, but in most instances, they will be based on special factors related to your crime. If you were arrested for driving while intoxicated, for instance, you will likely be required to attend alcohol classes or put an interlock device in your car. You may be required to avoid contact with any victim in your case. Almost each types of bond in Arizona will include conditions related to avoiding drug use or future crimes. The interesting question then revolves around what happens if you violate these conditions. Here’s a guide.

Man vs. Judge: What options will the court have if I violate my bail conditions?

At the outset, you should know that the trial judge will have the power to revoke your bond if you fail to live up to the conditions under which it was imposed. Judges have significant leeway to make their own decisions during this process. Some will give you a break, allowing you to continue on bond. Others will drive a hard bargain, revoking your bond the first time you make a mistake. Your will lawyer should have a good sense of just how restrictive your judge will be.

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Dealing with a Forfeiture in Arizona

Dealing with a Forfeiture in Arizona

As unfair as it may sound, the government can confiscate property under criminal forfeiture or civil forfeiture. Civil forfeiture is to seize property used in criminal activity, although charges have not been filed. When civil forfeiture is executed, the property owner loses all right, title and interest in the property to the government. Property that can be confiscated under these rules include:

  • Contraband
  • Proceeds gained as part of illegal activity
  • Tools or instruments used to commit crime

Civil forfeiture is based upon the basic establishment of probable cause that the property was used to commit a crime. When such an action is brought against you for your property, the time to contest the forfeiture is limited. Property may be seized through execution of a search warrant, whether there are criminal charges or convictions, or not.

Since 1985, over $7 billion dollars in property has been forfeited to the federal government. State governments also seize property for cases, with Arizona being frequently and heavily criticized in the media for having very aggressive forfeiture laws.

Having an experienced Arizona forfeiture attorney on your side will possibly enable you to gain the return of your property. The risk involved includes the possibility of having to pay attorney fees for the government, in addition to other costs, should you lose your case. (more…)


Civil Forfeiture Cases and Defenses

Civil forfeiture, also called civil seizure, or civil judicial forfeiture, is a controversial legal process in the United States in which law enforcement officers take assets from people suspected of being involved in a crime or some sort of illegal activity. The problem with forfeiture cases is that the person suspected of being involved with a crime or illegal activity will not be necessarily charged with a crime or wrongdoing.

Civil forfeiture is a controversial legal process. Sometimes, the law enforcement officers will simply threaten to seize property, or anything of value, such as gold, cash, real estate, a boat or a house. The actual act of seizure itself also falls under forfeiture if the officers suspect that it was being used in a crime. Those in favor of civil forfeiture see it as a powerful tool to thwart criminal activities and organizations. However, critics argue that the act itself leads to corruption and misbehavior by the law enforcement. There is an ongoing debate as to whether the overall benefits of forfeiture outweigh the drawbacks. (more…)


What to Do if You’re Charged with Criminal Fraud

If you have been charged with criminal fraud, theft, racketeering, money laundering, robbery, forgery, extortion, false reporting, shoplifting or other white collar crimes, you’re going to require a skilled Arizona criminal attorney.

Many times people are accused of Fraud by dishonest business partners or employers. Sometimes the Defendant has been told that they can pay personal expenses with company checks as a sort of “bonus” that the employer can then write off as a taxable event (i.e., “Lack of Knowledge” and “Lack of Intent”). When the relationship goes bad, the employer then simply accuses the employee of some sort of “Embezzlement”. Also, business deals may fall apart and an accuser can simply claim that they were misinformed or that key elements were omitted (i.e., “material omissions”) which caused them a loss. It is important to have all elements of the case analyzed thoroughly.

Click to learn more about possible defenses and/or punishment for criminal fraud.

It is important to hire an AV® rated law firm (the highest possible rating by Martindale Hubbell®). David Michael Cantor is a Fraud Attorney in Arizona and a Certified Criminal Law Specialist, per the Arizona Board of Legal Specialization. In addition, the Firm and all of its lawyers are listed in the Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers®. At DM Cantor, P.C., the majority of our Attorneys are ex-Prosecutors, and all of our Attorneys know the system well. For a free initial consultation, call us at 602-307-0808, or contact Arizona Criminal Attorney David Michael Cantor.


How a Good White Collar Lawyer in Arizona Can Leverage “Puffery”

The recent economic roller coaster face experienced by many corporations around the world has resulted in an unprecedented numbers of people in need of a white collar lawyer in Arizona. As the director of the FBI confirmed last fall, 24 large financial institutions have been investigated for some type of alleged fraud. Whether or not these investigations will result in a filing of charges, it is clear that the current financial crisis will bring about a wave of violations and civil suits alleging violations of the Security Exchange Act of 1934 based on purported material misstatements about a public company’s performance. These companies will soon become the clients of a white collar lawyer.

While these new cases may be bigger and have a higher profile than cases in the past, the legal issues are no different than those faced by any case involving a white collar lawyer. Most of the current cases center themselves around classic securities fraud. So while they may be bigger and more extensive, they involve the same basic issues as any other white collar crime.

A white collar defense lawyer in Arizona is likely to argue that the alleged statements were in fact not material, and therefore cannot form the basis of a legal liability. What counts as a material statement? Statements are considered material when there is a substantial likelihood that a reasonable shareholder would consider the matter relevant enough to affect his or her vote. (more…)


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