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What Happens if I Violate my Bail Conditions?

What Happens if I Violate my Bail Conditions?

If you’re arrested for a crime in Arizona, you will likely be given a bond by the judge in your case. When you receive this bond, you’ll have to abide by several “bail conditions.” What are these bond conditions? They’re particular to every case, but in most instances, they will be based on special factors related to your crime. If you were arrested for driving while intoxicated, for instance, you will likely be required to attend alcohol classes or put an interlock device in your car. You may be required to avoid contact with any victim in your case. Almost each types of bond in Arizona will include conditions related to avoiding drug use or future crimes. The interesting question then revolves around what happens if you violate these conditions. Here’s a guide.

Man vs. Judge: What options will the court have if I violate my bail conditions?

At the outset, you should know that the trial judge will have the power to revoke your bond if you fail to live up to the conditions under which it was imposed. Judges have significant leeway to make their own decisions during this process. Some will give you a break, allowing you to continue on bond. Others will drive a hard bargain, revoking your bond the first time you make a mistake. Your will lawyer should have a good sense of just how restrictive your judge will be.

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How to Post Bail at Maricopa County Jail in Phoenix, Arizona

Many people wonder how the bail bond process works at the Maricopa County Jail (also known as 4th Avenue Jail or Madison Street Jail) in Phoenix. To summarize, a judge uses a matrix form to determine how to best proceed in the matter of bail for an individual alleged offender. The offender’s matrix form takes individual court history into account and bail amount is determined according to the following factors:

  • Whether the person has failed to appear for a case in the past
  • Seriousness of the offense
  • Whether the individual is on probation
  • Other factors regarding personal character and risk toward re-appearing in court

The judge may determine that the individual can be released on his or her own recognizance. There may be a bond, or they may be non-bondable. Being non-bondable means they must remain in jail throughout their court process. Capital murder cases and those involving crimes against children are non-bondable. (more…)


What Are the Differences Between Jail and Prison in Arizona?

Jail vs Prison in Arizona

Many people use the terms “jail” and “prison” synonymously. But these two types of facilities have some distinct differences, as much as they have much in common.

When you are facing charges that may lead to prison time, or when you are put in jail for an offense, having the right lawyer on your side can mean the difference between staying locked up or gaining your freedom. At this critical time, you need an experienced criminal lawyer, such as the attorneys at the DM Cantor in Phoenix, Arizona.


Jails of Arizona

Jails are managed by local jurisdictions, cities and counties. These facilities are where people are held for the short term, usually while awaiting a hearing, sentencing, bail to be paid or other court process. When someone is suspected of committing a crime, he or she will be held in a jail as a detainee. Some occupants of city and county jails have been convicted of their crimes and serve a short sentence in the jail instead of being sent to a prison. (more…)


Pre-charge Investigation Stage Cases

‘Pre-charge’, also called the ‘Investigation Stage’ of a criminal case is the stage when someone is under observation for a criminal offense, but no formal action has been taken. When someone is involved in such a situation, it can have a significant negative impact on different areas of their life. This initial state precedes any formal charges. Usually, a person is considered to be involved in a pre-charge stage when they have been arrested by the law enforcement and have been questioned, but later released without facing any charges. This means that the person stands in imminent danger of getting arrested anytime if police find any evidence against them.

Even if the person has not been convicted, the arrest itself may be recorded and documented, which can have a negative impact on their personal life. Their story may make it to the newspaper headline, or it may be put up on any of the news reporting websites. The individual is stuck in the pre-charge stage after being arrested, until they are actually charged with the crime. Anyone who has been arrested in connection to a crime but was later released without charges, is advised to consult a qualified criminal defense attorney. (more…)


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