Click to call 602-307-0808 24/7 Click Here for Free Consultation

New Arizona Photo Radar Bill HB 2085 Requires Officer to issue ticket

David M Cantor, Arizona Criminal Lawyer, discusses House Bill 2076 and House Bill 2085 (the new Arizona photo radar bill) were prefiled on January 8, 2010 to be heard at the 2010 49th Legislature Second Regular Session.  If passed, HB 2085 would require that a photo radar ticket actually be issued by a law enforcement officer, and not by mail or a process server.  Currently, if you simply ignore a photo radar ticket received in the mail nothing will happen to you.  However, if a process server claims to have served you or a member of your household, you then must show up to court.  Many process servers are unscrupulous and will simply leave the ticket on your front door and claim that service was accepted.  This new House Bill would actually be a good thing for the people of Arizona.

HB 2076, if passed, would allow an officer to issue a ticket to a person who is smoking in a car if there are any other people in the car who are under 16 years of age.  The ticket would carry a $50.00 fine for each person who is under 16.  The one limitation attached to this House Bill is that the officer cannot pull somebody over purely because they are smoking with a young child in their car.  He must have reasonable suspicion that an additional traffic violation has occurred prior to initiating his stop.  Apparently if you are 16 or 17 (i.e., unable to drink, vote, or legally have sex) you are not protected by the law from second-hand smoke.

To learn more about Arizona photo radar laws, contact DM Cantor.


County Attorney Says TV Tainting Viewers, Jurors on Forensic Evidence

Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas is tired of forensic television shows tainting jurors and creating unrealistic demands for forensic evidence.

Thomas wants shows like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation on CBS and Law and Order on NBC to flash disclaimers, saying defendants are not automatically innocent if there is a lack of physical or forensic evidence.

“These shows are affecting jury preconceptions that are taken into jury deliberations,” Thomas said.

A survey of 102 prosecutors found 38 percent believe they’ve had at least one acquittal or hung jury when forensic evidence was unavailable to corroborate testimony. Prosecutors call it the “CSI Effect.”

But defense attorney David Michael Cantor said prosecutors always tell jurors that scientific evidence doesn’t lie.

“Now, they don’t want a lack of it to be perceived as reasonable doubt.”


Click to Watch Important Questions to Ask when Hiring a Lawyer

Request a Free Consultation

Fill out the form below to recieve a free and confidential intial consultation.


Arizona Defense Law Firm Associations and Awards
DM Cantor

Call 24/7 602-307-0808

40 N Central Ave, Ste 2300
Phoenix, AZ 85004
Click here for Directions

For Family Law questions please go to Cantor Law Group.
[contact-form-7 id="8868" title="Exit Intent"]